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2014
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Indigenous Peoples Days and Yomen Weda

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When
Mar 19–22, 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Where
Rocklin Campus Various locations around campus
5000 Rocklin Rd., Rocklin, CA 95677
Pricing
Attendance and presentations are free. Food, literature, arts and crafts available for purchase
Contact
Native American Club Chairman, Tiffany Adams , yellowhammerdesigns@yahoo.com, (916) 660-6145
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Take part in our inaugural Indigenous Peoples Days Festival

Event Details

The Sierra College Native American Club, the New Legacy Committee, the Sierra College Press and Heyday Books are co-sponsoring a four-day event—Indigenous Peoples Days during its Yomen Weda or Spring Equinox Festival at Sierra College on the Rocklin Campus. Lectures, exhibits, demonstrations and films by Native American specialists will discuss, recovery, acceptance, health and wellness, ethnobotany, art, literature, environmental issues, and much more.

Demonstrations will include tool, implement and musical instrument making and regalia design. California Native American literature and art will be available for review and purchase. On Saturday, March 22, the event will culminate in a Big Time on the campus—including Native American dancing and singing, blessings and prayers, food and art—with an evening reception at the Maidu Museum and Historic Site in Roseville.

Schedule of Events

  • Tuesday, March 18, 2014, 
    Behind the Door of a Secret Girl
    a film by Jack Kohler and Janessa Starkey 
    5 pm in Weaver Hall-Rm W-110

A historically traumatized community now has to contend with a cartel connected trafficker living on the reservation. Sammy, a teenage cutter, defies her mother’s drug-dealing boyfriend and with her best friend David, they race towards a deadly end and reveal what’s behind the door of a Secret Girl. Janessa Starkey is an award-winning member of the United Auburn Indian Community. This film has won 14 awards including Best Native Film at the Sacramento International Film Festival as well as many others. Producer Jack Kohler is Executive Producer of the non-profit Media Organization “On Native Ground.” Kohler’s short environmental films, “Once There was a River” and “K’ina kil will also be shown later in the week (see this schedule).

After the film there will also be a panel discussion with artists Johnny Clay and Tiffany Adams – Healing Through Art – This event is shared with Sierra College Feminist Majority Leadership Alliance.

  • Wednesday, March 19, 2014, 
    Cultural Leadership and the 7th Generation
    by Maggie Steele
    9:30-10:50 am in the Fireside Room (J-2)

Maggie Steele is a distinguished professional mediator/peacemaker and winner of the prestigious Mary Parker Follet Award by the Society of Professionals in Dispute Resolution. Maggie specialized in working with youth to prevent bullying, youth violence, gang conflict, and in promoting healing and wellness through grass roots organizing. Well respected in the Native American community, she also works closely with African Americans, Asian Americans, Caucasians, Elders, Hispanic/Latino, Pacific Islanders, Refugees and migrants.

  •  Wednesday, March 19, 2014,
    The Affordable Care Act and Covered California with Virginia Hedrick (Yurok-Karuk)
    11 am-12:20 pm in the Fireside Room (J-2)

The purpose of Mrs. Hedrick’s presentation is to engage people to join the discussion to help their families, communities, tribes and tribal programs to better understand the Affordable Care Act and Indian Health Care Improvement Act. Mrs. Hedrick has worked for the last three years in the Office of the Executive Director on outreach and training for the ACA. All are welcomed.

  • Wednesday, March 19, 2014, 
    Fatherhood is Sacred -
    Mike Duncan (Con-Cow/Wailake/Wintun)
    2-3:30 pm in the Music Building, Rm D-12

Mike Duncan is the founder and CEO of Native Dads Network in Sacramento. Mike successfully facilitates the “Fatherhood is Sacred” curriculum. He has had over 200 fathers attend his group and has helped create a network of fatherhood groups in Northern California. He uses topics such as historical trauma, cultural competency and healthy relationships to help participants look at barriers and to encourage traditional teachings as solutions. Mike professes that the family is the oldest and most important institution in society and is at the heart of Native American cultures. There is no more important work than fatherhood and motherhood.

  • Wednesday, March 19, 2014, 
    Tongva Boats and Language Preservation
    by L. Frank (Tongva-Acjachemen)
    3:30-4;50 pm, in Weaver Hall, Rm W-110

Artist, writer, tribal scholar, cartoonist and indigenous language activist, her regular column/graphic, “Acorn Soup,” has appeared in the quarterly magazine News from Native California since 1992 – featuring the comic adventures of Coyote in his various guises. L. Frank coauthored (with Kim Hogeland) First Families: Photographic History of California Indians in 2006. L. Frank is a board member of the California Indian Basket Weavers Association and a founding board member of the Advocates for Indigenous California Languages. She is actively involved in the Two-Spirit culture.

  • Wednesday, March 19, 2014, 
    Two Spirits - 
    Film viewing and LGBTQ discussion with Dr. Gabriel Estrada, L. Frank, and Dr. Matt Archer
    5-8 pm, in Weaver hall Rm W-110

Two Spirits interweaves the tragic story of a mother’s loss of her son with a revealing look at the largely unknown history of a time when the world wasn’t simply divided into male and female and many Native American cultures held places of honor for people of integrated genders. Fred Martinez was nádleehí, a male-bodied person with a feminine nature, a special gift according to his ancient Navajo culture. He was one of the youngest hate-crime victims in modern history when he was brutally murdered at age 16. Two Spirits explores the life and death of this boy who was also a girl, and the essentially spiritual nature of gender. Director, co-producer, and co-writer Lydia Nibley creates film and television projects under the banner of Riding The Tiger Productions.

Dr. Gabriel Estrada is of Nahuatl, Raramuri, Mestizo and Basque heritage. He is Associate Professor, Department of Religious Studies, California State University, Long Beach. His doctorate is in Comparative Cultural and Literary Studies from University of Arizona. He is Co-founder of City of Angels Two-Spirit Society (CATSS) and author of "Two Spirits, Nádleeh and Navajo LGBTQ2 Gaze” in American Indian Culture and Research Journal and “Two-Spirit Film Criticism: Fancydancing with Imitates Dog, Desjarlais and Alexie” in Post Script. His book in progress is "Two-Spirit Film: Queer Indigenous Media, Religion, AIDS, and Sci-Fi."

L. Frank is artist, writer, tribal scholar, cartoonist and indigenous language activist, her regular column/graphic, “Acorn Soup,” has appeared in the quarterly magazine News from Native California since 1992—featuring the comic adventures of Coyote in his various guises. L. Frank coauthored (with Kim Hogeland) First Families: Photographic History of California Indians in 2006. L. Frank is a board member of the California Indian Basketweavers Association and a founding board member of the Advocates for Indigenous California Languages. She is actively involved in the Two-Spirit culture.

Dr. Matt Archer is a Professor and Chair of the Anthropology Department at Sierra College. He earned his doctorate in sociocultural anthropology from the University of Texas at Austin in 2004 and has been teaching at Sierra College since then. Dr. Archer teaches Cultural Anthropology courses as well as the Anthropology of Sex, Gender and Sexuality and Globalization Studies. He is the current advisor of the Native Students Club of Sierra College.

  • Thursday, March 20, 2014, 
    Language Preservation and Cultural Sustainability 
    with Vincent Medina, Carlos Geisdorff, L. Frank, Rick Adams
    9:30-10:50 am in the Board Room (LRC Basement Level)

Vincent Medina was born at the site of his ancestral Jalquin Ohlone homeland. Strongly aware and proud of his Ohlone identity, he works to educate others of a continuous Ohlone presence and to dispel negative stereotypes of his people. While living in two worlds, both contemporary and traditional, he strives to bring Ohlone culture into the modern era in multiple ways. He works to reawaken his native Chochenyo Ohlone language. He works at Mission Dolores in San Francisco, where he has developed a fair, honest portrayal of the effects of the Missions on Ohlone people and the cultural resistance that came with the system. He serves on the Board of Directors for the Advocates of Indigenous California Language Survival, a statewide organization that aims to foster the restoration and revitalization of California Indian languages. Medina is Roundhouse Outreach Coordinator at Heyday Books, a publishing company that has produced several books by and about Ohlones and other California Indians. He shares his personal experiences on his blog Being Ohlone in the 21st Century.

Carlos Geisdorff is a member of the Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk and lives on the Tuolumne Reservation. He is the Cultural Coordinator for the Education Department where he teaches language to children and adults. He has attended Breath of Life Conferences in Berkeley; Language is Life Conferences at Marin Headlands and Davis; and many other language conferences throughout the state. He is a member of the Tuolumne Me-Wuk Language Preservation Committee. As a child he learned traditional songs and dances with some language from a Miwuk elder. Carlos teaches songs and dances in the Me-Wuk native language. He has resurrected Miwu’a which was close to being forgotten by coming up with an orthography and has developed phrase books and children’s books. Giesdorff and his Maidu wife, Amanda taught their children both familial styles of dancing.

L. Frank (Tongva/Acjachemen) is an artist, writer, tribal scholar, cartoonist and indigenous language activist. She coauthored (with Kim Hogeland) First Families: Photographic History of California Indians in 2006. L. Frank is a board member of the California Indian Basketweavers Association and a founding board member of the Advocates for Indigenous California Languages. She is actively involved in the Two-Spirit culture.

Rick Adams (Nisenon-Hawaiian) is Founder and Chairman of the Hutu Anape Cultural Foundation, a non-profit corporation dedicated to educating, promoting and preserving the cultural heritages of the California Native Americans and Polynesians. He is a Ceremonial Keeper and Language scholar of the Nisenon culture from the Sacramento region. Rick also works at the Maidu Museum & Historic Site in Roseville, a federally protected site, giving tours and teaching about the local Nisenon/Maidu culture. Rick speaks at schools and colleges discussing Native life in California before European contact.

  • Thursday, March 20, 2014,  
    Spring Equinox Celebration and Culture Exchange
    11:00 am-2:30 pm, on the Quad

Traditional Northern California cultural art demonstrations, native acorn food preparation, music, songs, storytelling, hand games, basket making, information tables. Some examples include pine nut bracelets, string demonstrations, Tule rope bracelets and beading. Calvin Hedricks (Mountain Maidu) will be presenting Mountain Maidu songs and stories and will demonstrate hand games and discuss how tournaments are organized. Renowned basket maker Julia Parker will demonstrate her art/craft.
Sage LaPena (Northern Wintu) will discuss native plant uses by historic and modern day peoples.
Alicia Adams (Chemehuevi, Konkow and Nisenan) will demonstrate string and Tule usage.
Heyday (Press/books) will have book/sales of their California Native American titles and News From Native California [magazine]. Maidu Museum and Historic Site will exhibit about their nearby facilities and programs.

  • Thursday, March 20, 2014, 
    Native Americans and the Mission System,
    by Vincent Medina
    2-3:20 pm, in Music Building, Room D-12

Vincent Medina was born at the site of his ancestral Jalquin Ohlone homeland. Strongly aware and proud of his Ohlone identity, he works to educate others of a continuous Ohlone presence and to dispel negative stereotypes of his people. While living in two worlds, both contemporary and traditional, he strives to bring Ohlone culture into the modern era in multiple ways. He works to reawaken his native Chochenyo Ohlone language. He works at Mission Dolores in San Francisco, where he has developed a fair, honest portrayal of the effects of the Missions on Ohlone people and the cultural resistance that came with the system. He serves on the Board of Directors for the Advocates of Indigenous California Language Survival, a statewide organization that aims to foster the restoration and revitalization of California Indian languages. Medina is Roundhouse Outreach Coordinator at Heyday Books, a publishing company that has produced several books by and about Ohlones and other California Indians. He shares his personal experiences on his blog Being Ohlone in the 21st Century.

  • Thursday, March 20, 2014 
    Dedication and presentation of Heyday Native American books and readings by authors and publishers.
    Malcolm Margolin, Lindsie Bear, Sage LaPena, Vincent Medina, Julia Parker, Frank LaPena, L. Frank, Friends of the Library, SC Press staff and board
    3:30-6 pm, in the Board Room, (LRC Basement Level)

Heyday Books (Berkeley) is the premier publisher of original California Native publications. Sierra College Friends of the Library has donated three complete sets of all of Heyday’s 26 Native American titles, one set each to each of Sierra College’s three library campuses. Additional, a complete hard-copy set of News from Native California, Heyday’s quarterly magazine has been donated and dedicated to the Sierra College archives. Join award-winning Heyday publisher Malcolm Margolin and California Indian Publishing Director Lindsie Bear at this book dedication and reading. Authors/artists SageLaPena, Vincent Medina, L. Frank and Julia Parker will present and read.

  • Thursday, March 20, 2014 
    Once We Had a River - 
    Native American social justice film by Jack Kohler and Anecita Agustinez
    7-9 pm, in the Dietrich Theatre

In 1880, five tribes were moved onto reservations along the San Luis Rey River through treaties enforced by the United States. Then in 1895, a diversion dam was built on the La Jolla Indian Reservation without their consent, diverting all of the water for the five reservations, to the newly founded City of Escondido. The United States sanctioned that act, uncontested until 1967. Then the newly formed California Indian Legal Services filed a lawsuit on behalf of the tribes. For forty seven years CILS and the tribes have been fighting for water that once ran through their reservations. Today, they must buy back that water from the City of Escondido. Once We Had a River uncovers the history of this struggle.

  • Friday, March 21, 2014,
    Cultural Leadership and the 7th Generation
    by Maggie Steele
    9-11 am, in the Fireside Room, J-2

Maggie Steele is a distinguished professional mediator/peacemaker and winner of the prestigious Mary Parker Follet Award by the Society of Professionals in Dispute Resolution. Maggie specialized in working with youth to prevent bullying, youth violence, gang conflict, and in promoting healing and wellness through grass roots organizing. Well respected in the Native American community, she also works closely with African Americans, Asian Americans, Caucasians, Elders, Hispanic/Latino, Pacific Islanders, Refugees and migrants.

  • The Future of Native American Students at Sierra CollegeBoard Room – LRC Basement Level
    1-3pm -  ROUNDTABLE – public invited

This roundtable is informational.  Visiting scholars and specialists from various California universities will discuss programs that are now available to Native American students elsewhere in the state.  Participants in the roundtable will include Sierra College administrators and managers, faculty and staff.  Regional tribal representatives will add to the discussion of with their interests and needs.  Sierra College students and the public are welcomed to this roundtable discussion of the future of Native American students at Sierra College.

  • Friday, March 21, 2014
    Ethnobotany of the California Indians
     by Sage LaPena
    7:30pm, Sewell Hall 111

Sage LaPena is a clinical herbalist, ethnobotanist, lecturer, teacher, and gardener specializing in both Native American and Western herbal traditions.‎ From the age of 7, Sage has been working with local medicine people from her tribe, the Northern Wintu (California), and other neighboring tribes. She is Water Resource Coordinator at Hopland Pomo Tribal EPA and has worked extensively in everything from Indian health to ecological restoration and conservation. She has been teaching “Ethnobotany of California native plants” for over twenty years, and leads plant walks throughout the state.

She will share her knowledge and experience of Native American uses of native plants, their restorative and healing qualities, and the significance of their conservation. This presentation is part of Sierra College's first annual Indigenous Peoples Days and Spring Equinox Celebration which will culminate on Saturday, March 22 with a Big Time on the campus (dancing, music, demonstrations, exhibits, etc.). Sage LaPena will be presenting at various times, on various issues, during the five-day event.
Admission: $5 general, $2 students/seniors, free to Museum members

For more information contact Sierra College Press Editor, Joe Medeiros at jmedeiros@sierracollege.edu, or (916) 660-8250.

SATURDAY – 3/22/2014

  • 10am-5pmBIG TIME
    On the Quad – Sierra College Rocklin

A Big Time is an intertribal gathering of western indigenous peoples of North America. Big Times were traditionally for trading and for redistributing wealth.  Hand games were incorporated along with straight trading.  Big Times were also simply for coming together, sharing dances and trading songs and for finding mates. Big Times are an integral part of intertribal relations in the Western United States, particularly California where the Gold Rush, boarding schools and termination attempted, but failed to succeed in the complete disintegration of Native peoples.

Dancing, singing, food, demonstrations, vendors and cultural sharing.

  • 6pm  Reception and film
    K’ina kil, The Slaver’s Son Written, directed and edited by Jack Kohler / On Native Ground, Produced by Anecita Agustinez
    Maidu Museum and Historic Site – Roseville, CA
    1970 Johnson Ranch Drive, Roseville, CA / (916) 774-5934

In partnership with Sierra College and the Native American Club, The Maidu Museum will host an Indigenous Peoples Days final reception and will screen the film “K’ina kil, The Slaver’s Son”, a story of the Native American experience during the Gold Rush. Meet filmmaker Jack Kohler (Hupa, Yurok, Karuk). The new film, Kin’a Kil The Slaver’s Son, is written, directed, and edited by Jack Kohler. It is produced by Anecita Agustinez. Its music was composed by Elwin Johnson.

Enjoy a special musical debut by Native Rock Band “Walan Amana”, performing “Honi Coni” original music about the Gold Rush experience, sung in the Nisenan language and with original music.

The movie, K’ina’kil is told through a lens focused on the Native experience. It is the story of Tintah, a young Native man, as he searches for purpose and peace in California’s raucous, brutal gold Rush.  Near the mine fields, Indian girls are kidnapped for sex and those native who refuse to bend to the will of the white men are hunted for profit.  This character-driven story tells of our country’s fortune and shame during California’s painful beginnings. While some fought for gold, Indians fought for their lives.

Reception from 6:30pm to 9pm / Film begins at 7:30pm / Admission free

For more information contact Sierra College Press Editor, Joe Medeiros at jmedeiros@sierracollege.edu, or (916) 660-8250.

Sponsored by: Native American Club, New Legacy Committee, Sierra College Press

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